Tag Archives: Health Advocacy

#DBlogWeek – If I could change the world…

Warning: This post is going to be hyperbolic at times.

Jean Paul-Sartre once said “hell is other people.” People with diabetes know this all too well. The tragedy of the situation is that it does not have to be that way.

Other people cause us hell when health insurance representatives try to make it difficult for us to receive medical technology that will improve our standards of living.

It does not have to be that way.

Other people cause us hell when when they decide to charge us 5-star prices for fast food quality test strips.

It does not have to be that way.

Other people cause us hell when they cast judgement upon us, sniping our self-esteem.

It does not have to be that way.

Other people cause the impatient among us hell when they play dumb after we have explained diabetes to them countless times.

It does not have to be that way.

Other people cause us hell when they trivialize or exaggerate diabetes.

It does not have to be that way.

Other people cause us hell when they act coldly…robotic…inhuman when we mention the unfair portion of BS that has been allotted to us.

It does not have to be that way.

Other people cause us hell by doing this… Other people cause us hell by doing that… Other people unnecessarily cause us hell in numerous ways. That is the underlying issue that I care most about.

This is unacceptable! This is inexcusable! This must stop!

As people with diabetes, we have enough to deal with as it is. I accept that. What I can’t accept is other people making things artificially difficult. Thankfully, things are changing.

Other people’s actions, occasionally, throw us into a pit. The actions of those in the Diabetes Online Community protect us from the pit, and pull those within out of it.

Our actions are our hope!

Food for Thought: Diabetes Advocacy

  1. An advocate is a fighter for the interests of those who would otherwise be ignored and trampled upon by society.
  2. Advocacy can take innumerable forms. Political activism, educating the public, and social/cultural criticism are just some of the forms that diabetes advocacy can take.
  3. Rather than seeing diabetes advocacy as an activity of a select few, we should see it as a project that all diabetics (and their loved ones) can engage in.
  4. The perfect health care system is a myth. Regardless of the form of system we choose to have, health advocacy is essential to the protection of the interests of patients.
  5. We need to broaden our view of what constitutes diabetes advocacy.
  6. Diabetes advocates can be thought of as forming a choir. More individuals = a louder collective voice.
  7. The louder our voice, the more that it’ll stand out amongst a sea of other voices.
  8. An ideal advocate would be one in whom a fighting spirit is tempered by prudence.
  9. How one chooses to advocate isn’t what matters most. The main thing is that one is taking action.
  10. Since our project is a team effort, we don’t all have to be doing the same task. We can each contribute in such a way that is in line with our talents, interests, etc. There’s a place for us all.